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holiday knitting

  • Pumpkin Hat

    100 Hats to Knit & Crochet

    I love Halloween. It is my favorite holiday. I have a friend with a new baby. So, I thought I would crochet him a cute little Pumpkin Hat. I used Crème de la Crème 100% cotton. I used three different colors orange, brown, and green. This pattern will fit an infant/toddler. I didn't get this pattern from a Leisure Arts book. 100 Hats to Knit and Crochet has hats that you could modify to work for your needs.

    Pumpkin Crochet Hat

    With a size G hook. Chain 60 stitches. Join in the round with a slip stitch. Be careful not to twist!

    Row 1: With main color (orange) chain 1, single crochets all the way around, and slip stitch into the chain 1. Row 2: Chain 3, double crochets all the way around. Continue Row 2 until the hat is about 3.25(3 ¼) to 3.50(3 ½) inches tall.

    Decrease is chain 3, 7 double crochet, and crochet 2 together, then 8 double stitches and crochet 2 together. You are going to continue decreasing by 1 stitch until you finish the chain 3 and 3 double crochet and crochet 2 together, 4 double crochet and crochet 2 together.

    Color change/Stem: To join the brown yarn slip stitch where you slipped the last stitch, chain 2, double crochet around. I didn’t crochet 2 together on the first round, because I did 2 regular double crochets into the next two stitches. The 3rd and 5th stitch a double into the middle of the lower stitch, and the 4th double crochet I went into the lower stitch. Continue this all the way around. The next round start your decreases chain 3, 2 double crochet and crochet 2 together, 3 double crochet and crochet 2 together. Continue decreasing by 1 stitch until you get to six stitches left and do double crochets until you get the stem length that you want then crochet 2 together 3 times.

    Green curly cue: Chain 35 stitches or however many you want to do. Do 6 double crochets into the 2nd stitch and 4 more stitches into ever chain stitch. Bind off when you get to the end. With a darning needle or crochet hook attach where ever you want it.

     

  • Boot Cuff

    Cool-Weather Family Fashions

    I needed a quick project to take on the go this week. I looked through all my Leisure Arts books and I saw these really cute Boot Cuffs in Cool-Weather Family Fashions. I used a bulky wool yarn. I have no idea what the name of this cream colored yarn is. I hate when my labels fall off. It was a yarn that I had in my stash.

    FullSizeRender (36) Use a place marker on the knit row side. This is the right side.

    Finished Cool Weather Fashions Boot Cuff

    I knitted the Boot Cuffs on size 11 straight needles. I love the pattern that this makes. It is quite a lovey stitch. One row is a rib stitch and the next row is a knit. I’m going to do a scarf or a cowl next with this stitch. If you want to knit this and you don’t like sewing up the sides you of your projects. You could cast on the number of stitches that you need for the size you require onto double point needles. Join in the round making sure not to twist. I know that is what I’m going to do next time I knit these. Remember Christmas is just a little over 3 months away. These would be a quick and easy project for someone who loves to wear boots.

    Boot cuffs as ear warmers Or a boot cuff for a dog cowl or earmuffs. Just kidding!!! I am not that bad!

     

  • Knit Hat

    I have been coloring in my Leisure Arts coloring books off and on all week and my favorite colors right now are neon iridescent colors. When I saw the Toybox Collection yarn called Candy at my local yarn shop called Yarn Kandy the yarn is 100% acrylic. I knew that I had to get it to knit a hat for a friend who runs very early in the morning.

    Beginner Friendly Knitting

    I know that she wears other iridescent clothing when she runs. But I wanted to knit her a hat to keep her ears warm, and something else so that she can be seen when it is still dark. Leisure Arts has neon iridescent colored yarns but it is a bulky yarn. You can use it but you will probably have to cast on less stitches and use a bigger size circular knitting needle.

     

     

    Finished Knit Hat CircleCircular Knitting a Hat

    My knitted hat pattern isn’t a written pattern. It could be written some place. I just haven’t seen it. Leisure Arts has a hat similar to the hat that I have knitted called Beginner-Friendly Knitting by Rita Weiss.  I just played with it until I got it right. I casted on 88 stitches on size 8 circular knitting needles, the first time I casted on 96 and it was way too big. I noticed this after I was 6 inches in and I had to rip it all out and start again. Joined in the round make sure not to twist. Going to start a rib stitch which is K2, P2 for an inch to inch and a half, but don’t forget your place marker to show were you joined. Then knit in the round until the hat is 6 inches. Decrease knit 6 knit 2 together all the way around to were your place marker is. When you start decreasing you are going to needle double point knitting needles. Knit the next row. Continue decreasing until you have 11 stitches left. I know that the photo has a hole I stopped at 22 stitches because my friend who this was for asked to. She wanted it so that hat could have a little ventilation. When you are done cut a 6 inch tail and with a darning needle weave the end through all the stitches on your double point. I always go around twice just to be safe. Tuck in your ends and you have a hat.

    Finished Knit Hat

    I hate to say it but Christmas is going to be here in a blink of an eye. School starts in a few days. Everyone needs a warm hat. Great for Christmas, birthday, or a just because I was thinking about you.

  • Slouchy Beanie with a Twist

    I started this kids hat by Leisure Arts called Forward and Reverse from the book Knit Celebrity Slouchy Beanies for the Family three different times. The first time I either missed adding a stitch or I dropped a stitch. The second time I got two inches in and I didn’t really like how the pattern looked so I thought: “What if I didn’t leave off the purl stitch at the end of the second row knit the last nine? How would it look?” Hmmmmm!!

    IMG_7668

    So for the third time I cast on my 70 stitches and worked the rib stitch 1 ½ inches, worked my stitches off the size 6 circular needles to size 8 circular needles, and then the next round I added my stitches evenly around. Don’t forget to use place markers! I used 3 different place markers; the first, where I joined it in the round. The second,  to move up the hat so that when I do my decreases I know that is where I joined it and that is where I start decreasing. The third marker is the one that is going to continue to move around the hat.

    Since I adjusted the pattern slightly by a few stitches, I did a few extra rows to where I got to a purl 1 knit 1 at the place marker that shows where I connected it in the round and followed the rest of the pattern. If this knitting project wasn’t a success, well it would not have been my first or my last. One of the rules that I learned from my many art classes: you have to know the rules in order to break the rules. You have to at least try. You have to take a chance. All-in-all, this project was a success.

    FullSizeRender (24)

  • Easter Egg Dishcloth

    Wow! Easter is a day away. I have finished crocheting a cute little Easter egg dishcloth just in time. I found the pattern for this in a Leisure Arts book called Crochet book called A Dishcloth a month. So if you are looking for a last minute project it didn't take much time at all. Continue reading

  • Praying Hands

    Easter is just a couple days away. I am still addicted to washcloths/dishcloths. I really liked the Dishcloths for Special Days by Julie A Ray. I knitted the Praying Hands washcloth in just a couple hours. I used yellow Lily’s Sugar n’ Cream worsted cotton. Continue reading

  • Knitting a Spooktacular Ghost Hat

    I knitted this ghostly hat for my daughter!  I had been thinking about knitting the Ghost Hat in Knit Hats for Babies for a while now, but I had to get a start on it when my daughter saw the model picture and gasped "Is that for me?"  I knew I had to make it quickly before she changed her mind.

    The patterns in Knit Hats for Babies are written for sizes Newborn, 3-6 months, and 12 months.  I made the twelve-month size and cast on with the recommended #7 needles even though my gauge runs large and hoped that this would fit my three-year-old.  It did.  I knit pretty loosely, and this is a simple rolled brim hat made with worsted weight yarn.  She could probably wear this next year!

     

    (Note: she's also kind of small.  Your three-year-old may vary.)

    I knitted up the body--straight stockinette until you get to the decrease rounds--in a couple of evenings and did the 'face' this weekend.  I was lazy, and crocheted the circles instead of knitting them.  I wish I had made the mouth a little more crooked, but I feel like this face is creepy enough as it is.

     

    My daughter was so thrilled with her newest hat that she actually agreed to model this for me!  She hasn't done that in quite a while, so I was pretty excited when I realized that she must really love this.  It's such a good feeling!  I'm also a little unsettled at how much she likes Halloween things, but I'm still excited that she loves her new ghost hat.

     

    This was a quick knit on top of being adorable and fun.  It would be a great beginner project for learning to work in the round, and the smaller sizes would need to be worked on smaller needles.  And, you get to work an I-cord for the top bit and work on your backstitching for the mouth!  There are a lot of techniques you could work on with this hat, and then you'd have a silly little hat to show for it. 

    I'm not a big Halloween person, but my little girl loves skeletons and spiders and bats and pumpkins (let's not talk about candy) and so she's in heaven with all things related to Halloween showing up in all the stores.  I'm glad she's enjoying her spooky ghost hat so much, and I had fun cranking this out for her.  Hope the pictures didn't scare you!

  • A Warm Pumpkin Hat for a Wee Noggin

    I'm sharing a recycled post with you today because it's about pumpkin hats.  Who doesn't love a good post about pumpkin hats!?  I made this Pumpkin Hat from Warm Hats for Wee Noggins and it's just so cute I had to show it to you again. Enjoy!

    Okay, I held off for as long as I could.  But we're nearly halfway through September, Arkansas's heat wave is nearly gone, and it is just plain time to start talking about pumpkin things.  Actual pumpkins, pumpkin-flavored drinks, pumpkin recipes--I love them all.  But it wasn't until I had my daughter a couple of years ago that I learned of the wonderful world of pumpkin hats.

    I love a good theme hat, obviously.  But a pumpkin hat?  Oh man.  Knock me over with a skein of sock yarn.  I cannot handle that kind of cute.  One of the very first times I successfully followed a hat pattern was when I made my little girl a pumpkin hat.  I was super motivated because there was no way I was going to take her to the pumpkin patch without a hand knitted pumpkin hat.

    Oh look, it's all my dreams coming true in one chilly afternoon.  Also, holy crappy decrease stitches, Batman!

    My little girl's hat still fits her, but I wanted to try out the Punkin' Patch hat from Warm Hats for Wee Noggins because this pattern has a leaf AND a tendril.  Besides, I rationalized to myself, I have a friend at work who loves pumpkins and this would be really precious on her granddaughter.  And you guys, this little hat did not disappoint.

    I love it! 

    As always, I went down a needle size (to a Size 7) because of my gauge, but that's it.  And that's not even really a mod.  Everything about this adorable little creation is perfect.  It calls for your standard worsted weight yarn, and I used some Red Heart and Vanna's Choice along with scraps for the leaf and tendril. 

    Oh, and that stem?  It involves just the tiniest bit of stranded knitting.

    It doesn't hurt a bit, I swear!  Since there's only three rows of knitting with two colors, and the hat itself is so small, this would be an excellent introduction to stranded knitting for a beginner.  And, it's adorable.  Just stinking adorable.

    As you can tell, this hat will fit a head slightly larger than a pie pumpkin.

    Well, probably a lot larger than a pie pumpkin.

    I knit this in the 12 months size, but Warm Hats for Wee Noggins includes instructions for 3 preemie sizes and 3 full-term sizes with each pattern.  This could be a lovely little hat for any small person--especially those little folks who need warmth the most!

    I really love this hat.  I love the way you knit the stem.  I love that the leaf is lighter than the stem.  I love that the tendril ..... exists.  Seriously, even if you don't have the yarn to make the leaf a lighter green than the stem, please find a tiny bit of scrap yarn to make this tendril.  It's an itty bitty amount of knitting and it's all curly and adorable and the perfect thing to add to a perfect hat for a perfectly adorable baby.  You just have to.  Promise me.

    I realize I sound a bit silly but I take my silly hats very seriously. It's nearly fall and the pumpkins are here.

    More importantly, so are the pumpkin hats!

    This post was first published on September 12, 2013.  And if you were wondering: my friend at work was thrilled with this hat and said it was her granddaughter's favorite hat.  She emailed me a few cute pictures of her little punkin wearing the hat.  I'm hoping it fits her this year as well!

  • Weekly Dishcloth: Pumpkin Party!

    Well, now I don't want to stop with the holiday crafts.  I've started decorating my home for fall and now I'm making Halloween crafts.  The first completed one? The Pumpkin dishcloth from Dishcloths for Special Days!

    This is a sweet little dishcloth.  And I do mean little.  You only cast on 35 stitches for each of these patterns, and you get a sweet little dishcloth that measures about 7" X 9" square. I like it. And I love these designs where you you draw a picture with purl stitches, and I love this grinning jack o'lantern. 

    If you make one for yourself, I suggest you use the orangest yarn you can find.  I tried a pumpkin dishcloth with yarn that was a little more peachy than orange once.  It looked like I made a dishcloth with some weird peach on it.  You know, if someone carved a face into a peach.  Go with orange.  Anything that looks like a hunter's vest or a traffic cone will do beautifully.  I used Sugar'n Cream yarn in the Hot Orange color.  It is bright.

    This dishcloth is fun and festive and cheerful.  I got a craving for 'fun-size' chocolate bars while I was knitting it.  And it's marked as an easy pattern.  Like all the patterns in Dishcloths for Special Days, the pattern has written instructions and a chart.  This is a great pattern for a beginning knitter, or a knitter who's new to charts, or someone who gets excited about holiday projects.  I think you can guess which one I am! 

    Happy weekend crafting!

  • Weekly Dishcloth: The Dishcloth was Hung by the Chimney with Care

    Christmas will be here before you know it! No, really: it's barely three and a half months away.  I thought I should make a dishcloth.  So I tried out the Stocking pattern from Dishcloths for Special Days.

    I have nearly a full cone of red cotton yarn and I do love Christmas stockings.  And I like these types of dishcloths where you make a picture with your purl stitches.  The pattern calls for #8 needles, and I figured I should jump down to a #6 because I have a loose gauge.  But my #6 needles were all occupied, so I used #5s.  That's why this is a bit skinny.  I bet this will loosen up with some use.  Cotton can shrink a bit when it's dried, but it's also less likely to snap back after it stretches in hot water.  I bet it will all even out.  Either way, you can tell that this is a stocking on this dishcloth and you'll probably still be able to tell even after this has been through a few washings.

    When I was growing up, my mom had a few Christmas dish towels and coffee cups.  Most of our seasonal things were purely decorative--wreaths, wallhangings, and whathaveyou--but the everyday items were really fun for me to use.  If you're going to dry off some dishes, you may as well use that dish towel with Santa on it and then enjoy that picture of his jolly face when you draped it over something.  Having even mundane, year-round types of items that celebrated the season made me happy.

    I'm the same way with dishcloths.  I like the idea of using my Christmas-y dishcloths during December.  Although, I have to say that I also love using my Christmas-y dishcloths when we're nowhere near December.  I crocheted a Christmas-y dishcloth last season that I sometimes pull out from the back of the drawer because I just want to see some Christmas cheer when I clean up a mess.  I'm hoping this brings a little bit of Christmas cheer to my gift stash, and to whomever eventually receives this as a gift.

    I had actually planned on knitting the Pumpkin dishcloth for this week, but I wasn't sure if I had enough orange yarn.  But now I'm glad I've knitted another little Christmas project.  It's never too early to get in the spirit, right?  Right?  Let's pretend like that's the case.

    Because I still have a lot of red cotton yarn and there's a candy cane pattern in here that's just waiting for me to try it out. 

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